Artists

Max Beckmann

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    MAX BECKMANN
    DIE FÜRSTIN - 1920
    Kaltnadelradierung, 21 x 15,5 cm
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    MAX BECKMANN
    DER NEGER - 1921
    Kaltnadelradierung, 31 x 28 cm
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    MAX BECKMANN
    HERR MÜLLER, ICH UND DIE BUFFETMAMSELL - 1920
    Kaltnadelradierung, 21 x 17 cm
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    MAX BECKMANN
    PORTRÄT FRAU H. M. (NAICA) - 1923
    Holzschnitt, 47 x 34 cm
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    MAX BECKMANN
    WEIBLICHER KOPF NACH HINTEN GEDREHT
    (BILDNIS FRIDEL BATTENBERG)
    Lithographie, 43 x 32 cm
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    MAX BECKMANN
    SARIKA MIT ZIGARETTE - 1922
    Lithographie, 67 x 48 cm
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    MAX BECKMANN
    FLUSSLANDSCHAFT - 1923
    Lithographie, 30 x 22 cm
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    MAX BECKMANN
    KINDER AM FENSTER - 1922
    Radierung, 41 x 30 cm
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    MAX BECKMANN
    SÜNDENFALL - 1946
    Blatt 14 aus der Folge - Day and Dream
    Lithographie, 40 x 30 cm

Max Beckmann was born in Leipzig in 1884. In 1900 he started studying at the art school in Weimar. In 1903 he moved to Paris and studied at the Académy Colarossi. Since 1904 Beckmann had lived in Berlin. His exhibitions in Germany were well received, especially with the Berlin Secession. In 1907 he became a member of the Berlin Secession. In 1925 he attended the Masterclass in the Städelschule Frankfurt. Already at the beginning of the 30ies he came into conflict with the Nazis. Beckmann was defamed as a degenerate artist and about 500 of his works were confiscated. For this reason Beckmann emigrated to Paris together with his wife, then to Amsterdam and finally to the United States. Then he started working as a lecturer at the Washington University Art School and later at the art school of the Brooklyn Museum at New York. In 1950 he died in New York. At the beginning of his artistic career his paintings were influenced by the impressionist style. From about 1916 onwards Beckmanns paintings got influenced by expressionism. He focused on the substantive statement, which, to him, was more important than the pictorial elements. The motifs are typical for that time: time-critical and ironic.